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The Power Institute is pleased to present a lecture by Ann Reynolds, Associate Professor, Art History (Modern and Contemporary Art and Visual Culture), University of Texas. Using a group of literary and cinematic descriptions of cocktail parties from this decade, Reynolds’ lecture will consider how collectivity was experienced, even if fleetingly, and how she, and hopefully others, lacking other types of archival evidence, might use these descriptions of social collectives to imagine history differently.

 

ABOUT

How to describe the group dynamic among individuals whose relationships were crucial to a historical moment, but who never appeared together in any type of formalized group portrait? In 1940s New York, the cocktail party provided artists, filmmakers, and writers with a rhetoric for describing how relationships among individuals might have looked, felt, and signified. Using a group of literary and cinematic descriptions of cocktail parties from this decade, Reynolds considers how collectivity was experienced, even if fleetingly, and how she, and hopefully others, lacking other types of archival evidence, might use these descriptions of social collectives to imagine history differently.

 

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Ann Reynolds is an Associate Professor in the Department of Art and Art History and the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. In her research and teaching, she focuses on twentieth and twenty-first century art and visual culture in the United States and Europe. Her recent publications include essays on Joan Jonas for the 2015 Venice Biennale; the experience of remoteness in relation to land art (Centre Georges Pompidou Spring 2015); Bob Fleischner, Jack Smith, and Ken Jacobs’ film Blonde Cobra (Criticism Spring 2014); Charles Simonds’ Urban Dwellings (Dumbarton Oaks, 2011); Zoe Leonard’s Dia Beacon installation So you see I am here after all (Dia Art Foundation and Yale University Press, 2010); a co-edited anthology entitled Political Emotions (Routledge Press, 2010); and an essay on feminist exhibitions and publics circa 1970 for Witness to her Art (Bard Center for Curatorial Studies and D.A.P. Press, 2006). She is the author of Robert Smithson: Learning From New Jersey and Elsewhere (MIT Press, 2003), which has been recently translated into French as Du New Jersey au Yucatán, leçons d’ailleurs (SIC Editions, 2014). She is currently working on a new book entitled In Our Time. Through this study she will address the cinematic and social circumstances of various intergenerational creative communities in New York during the 1940s through the 1960s. She and her co-curator, Michael Duncan, are also developing an exhibition focused on the magazine View (1940-1947). The exhibition is tentatively scheduled to open at the Harry Ransom Center in 2019, travel to the Yale University Art Museum, and possibly a third venue in California. During the fall of 2006, she was a Fellow at the Clark Institute in Williamstown, MA. She has also been the recipient of five teaching awards including the College of Fine Arts Distinguished Teaching Award in 2006.

 

DETAILS

6pm

Tuesday 5 June, 2018

Quadrangle Building, Philosophy Room S249

The University of Sydney

For enquiries, contact: powerinstitute.events@sydney.edu.au

 

REGISTRATION

Free and open to all with registration via Eventbrite.

 

 


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